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Colorado Springs

Audiology, Inc.

 

Phone  719.520.1155

LOCATION  & DIRECTIONS

Dr. Gene McHugh

Licensed Audiologist

In Colorado

 

 

OFFICE HOURS

Mountain Time USA

Mon-Thurs

9:00AM-5:00PM

Closed Fridays

 

 © Copyright 2017 

 

 

UNDERSTANDING  THE  AUDI0GRAM

     People tend to view hearing loss as a medical problem. As such, physicians represent an important source of information, inspiration, guidance and hope for people with hearing issues. When physicians screen hearing during health exams, they can determine if hearing loss exists and counsel patients on how to best treat the problem including follow up with a qualified audiologist. At present, surveys suggest 6% of physicians in the U.S. routinely screen hearing because of a limitation of time.  We find that a physicians' greater awareness of both the physical and psychological effects of hearing loss can help their patients enjoy life more fully. 

 
 

 

For more information on physician awareness go to the Better Hearing Institute website.

 

UNDERSTANDING THE AUDIOGRAM 

 

      An audiogram is a picture of  one's hearing.  Results (thresholds) are recorded on the audiogram.  The softest sound detected at each pitch (frequency) is recorded on the audiogram (see the audiogram below).  

 

      Pitch (or frequency) is situated along the top.  As a reference, 250Hertz (Hz) is about "middle C" on the piano."   500Hz is one octave above middle C.  1000Hz is two octaves about C, 2000Hz three octaves, and so on. 

 

      Loudness or intensity is located on the left side with 0 decibels (dB) representing very quiet sound and 120dB, representing an extremely loud sound to a person with normal hearing. 

 

     The audiogram on the left demonstrates the different degrees of hearing loss and how they are interpreted in terms of disability.

 

The Audiogram

0-25dB

Normal hearing.

   

25-40dB

Mild hearing loss.

   

40-70dB

Moderate loss hearing loss

   

70-90dB

Severe hearing loss

   

90dB or worse

Profound hearing loss

 

HEARING PROBLEMS & PITCH         

     Relationship between pitch and word understanding.  The frequencies below 1000Hz tend to give us the sensation of loudness, whereas the frequencies above 1000Hz tend to relate to word understanding.  Lower frequencies are more related to speech sounds (phonemes) incorporating the vocal cords (such as all the vowels and the following consonants (/b/, /d/, /g/, /j/, /l/, /m/, /n/, /r/, /v/, /w/, /z/).  Higher frequency phonemes do not use the vocal cords (such as /s/, /f/, /h/, /k/, /p/, /kw/, /t/, /x/).         The audiogram on the left is a relatively typical one.  It shows better thresholds in the lower pitch range, gradually becoming worse at increasing pitches.        

     The person hears the vowels and voiced consonants well enough, but has trouble perceiving the higher frequency phonemes.  Their primary problem is "word understanding."  Audiologists normally octave frequencies between 250-8000Hz because they are most important for speech understanding.    Thresholds averaging 0-25 decibels (dB) are considered "within normal limits" (for adults).  
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